patagoniaflyfish:

Silver Lining

Some absolutely fantastic footage of tarpon up close and personal. This video has it all: big fish taking flies, some legendary tail walks and rock solid reasoning for why we should all enjoy our time on the water – friends, nature and the creation of lifelong relationships and memories.

The flip side of this story is the environmental concerns over what is being proposed in Key West: dredging a wider and deeper channel to accommodate the largest of cruise ships in the port. At stake, the surrounding habitat, including coral reefs and spawning grounds for many species native to the area. Is it possible to balance economy and environment?

A great message, please share this around.

original content Jekyl Works 

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rodandbarrel:

Big Fish Lost
Early in my flyfishing career I used to go to a spot along the Griffen Road Canal in Davie, FL that 20-years ago was full of baby tarpon. The fly of choice was a yellow marabou muddler. Muddlers, with their bullet shaped spun deer hair heads, have a way of pushing just under the surface film of the water creating a tiny head wake that tarpon find irresistible. I had done pretty well catching tarpon in this spot most of which the tarpon were 10-to no more than 20-lbs in size. There was a certain outflow that emptied into the canal from a ditch that was full of gambusia minnows. Tarpon would routinely gang up at the mouth of this outflow when the water was emptying into the canal ambushing minnows flushed disoriented by the roiling waters . It was a summer afternoon and with the later days of summer I had headed over to this spot as soon as I had gotten out of work. It might have been my first cast when a sizable tarpon exploded underneath my fly. This was not 20-pounder but a full 70-pound fish. My 9wt was ill equiped to handle such a large tarpon and I found myself running down the canal passing the rod around trees on the bank and doing my best to keep up. This was the largest fish at that time for me on fly and I was more than a little excited about landing it. The fish jumped and dove and ran back and forth. Cars were stopping to watch me fight this fish. An hour into the fight I had the fish gulping air on the surface but noticed my fly line was most likely threaded beneath a sunken tree branch given the angle of the line in respect to the fish on the surface. It was getting dark when I decided there was no way I was going to land this fish with the line caught under a branch. I had to make the terrible decision to break him off and I did. Such a bummer not to land this fish but I had to take away an excellent strike and great fight.
rodandbarrel:

Big Fish Lost
Early in my flyfishing career I used to go to a spot along the Griffen Road Canal in Davie, FL that 20-years ago was full of baby tarpon. The fly of choice was a yellow marabou muddler. Muddlers, with their bullet shaped spun deer hair heads, have a way of pushing just under the surface film of the water creating a tiny head wake that tarpon find irresistible. I had done pretty well catching tarpon in this spot most of which the tarpon were 10-to no more than 20-lbs in size. There was a certain outflow that emptied into the canal from a ditch that was full of gambusia minnows. Tarpon would routinely gang up at the mouth of this outflow when the water was emptying into the canal ambushing minnows flushed disoriented by the roiling waters . It was a summer afternoon and with the later days of summer I had headed over to this spot as soon as I had gotten out of work. It might have been my first cast when a sizable tarpon exploded underneath my fly. This was not 20-pounder but a full 70-pound fish. My 9wt was ill equiped to handle such a large tarpon and I found myself running down the canal passing the rod around trees on the bank and doing my best to keep up. This was the largest fish at that time for me on fly and I was more than a little excited about landing it. The fish jumped and dove and ran back and forth. Cars were stopping to watch me fight this fish. An hour into the fight I had the fish gulping air on the surface but noticed my fly line was most likely threaded beneath a sunken tree branch given the angle of the line in respect to the fish on the surface. It was getting dark when I decided there was no way I was going to land this fish with the line caught under a branch. I had to make the terrible decision to break him off and I did. Such a bummer not to land this fish but I had to take away an excellent strike and great fight.

rodandbarrel:

Big Fish Lost

Early in my flyfishing career I used to go to a spot along the Griffen Road Canal in Davie, FL that 20-years ago was full of baby tarpon. The fly of choice was a yellow marabou muddler. Muddlers, with their bullet shaped spun deer hair heads, have a way of pushing just under the surface film of the water creating a tiny head wake that tarpon find irresistible. I had done pretty well catching tarpon in this spot most of which the tarpon were 10-to no more than 20-lbs in size. There was a certain outflow that emptied into the canal from a ditch that was full of gambusia minnows. Tarpon would routinely gang up at the mouth of this outflow when the water was emptying into the canal ambushing minnows flushed disoriented by the roiling waters . It was a summer afternoon and with the later days of summer I had headed over to this spot as soon as I had gotten out of work. It might have been my first cast when a sizable tarpon exploded underneath my fly. This was not 20-pounder but a full 70-pound fish. My 9wt was ill equiped to handle such a large tarpon and I found myself running down the canal passing the rod around trees on the bank and doing my best to keep up. This was the largest fish at that time for me on fly and I was more than a little excited about landing it. The fish jumped and dove and ran back and forth. Cars were stopping to watch me fight this fish. An hour into the fight I had the fish gulping air on the surface but noticed my fly line was most likely threaded beneath a sunken tree branch given the angle of the line in respect to the fish on the surface. It was getting dark when I decided there was no way I was going to land this fish with the line caught under a branch. I had to make the terrible decision to break him off and I did. Such a bummer not to land this fish but I had to take away an excellent strike and great fight.

Comments
Comments

Stumbled upon this video posted on Moldy Chum. Take a few minutes to check it out, if you give at least half a shit about inshore fishing in Florida, its well worth your time.

"Science and the pinnacle of big-game fishing come together in this film, which features some of the only known video ever captured in the wild of one of the world’s most endangered fish, the largest fish in Florida’s inshore waters and the first marine fish protected by the Endangered Species Act - the smalltooth sawfish."

Tumblr is evidently fucking up and not showing Vimeo videos. Go here if it’s not working on your end… http://vimeo.com/m/45092187
Comments
stokesurfboards:

Caught  locally at a bodyboarding, skimming spot popular with tourists. Don’t have the photo credit, no disrespect intended.
stokesurfboards:

Caught  locally at a bodyboarding, skimming spot popular with tourists. Don’t have the photo credit, no disrespect intended.
stokesurfboards:

Caught  locally at a bodyboarding, skimming spot popular with tourists. Don’t have the photo credit, no disrespect intended.

stokesurfboards:

Caught  locally at a bodyboarding, skimming spot popular with tourists. Don’t have the photo credit, no disrespect intended.

Comments
Comments

stokesurfboards:

Graphic from last Spring. Minor Threat, Black Flag, Ian MacKaye, and Henry Rollins.

MY WAR SIDE 2!!!

Comments
rodandbarrel:

I fished this past Sunday afternoon in the legendary Holylands of the deep everglades. The bass fishing here is exceptional and my last visit six weeks ago resulted in 150-fish landed in about 5-hours of fishing. (For the record - I don’t count missed strikes or fish that released themselves). Anyway, I caught this nice sow its belly presumably full of row. It slammed a watermelon colored Gambler Super Stud right off the surface in a cannon ball strike that startled me more than anything. Our bass here in South Florida spawn anytime now in late January and early February. Prior to spawn they feed pretty aggressively in the month of December. Some of the  biggest bass of the year are caught during the spawn. Ethical or not anglers do well targeting spawning beds with a 10-inch worm. As the worm is cast past and then reeled into the bed the bass assumes it is a snake attempting to eat its eggs and will attack it. My largest bass, an 11-pounder was caught this way early one March in the center of the State of Florida applying this very techniquw. I don’t have a photo to share of that fish because I was wading in waste deep water and had no camera with me. That day I caught 8-trophy fish the smallest at six-pounds, 2-seven pounders, 2-nines, a ten and the eleven. What bucket mouth the 11-pounder was. I had hooked it right at the back of it’s throat and it took all of my hand to reach in it mouth to work the hook out and all the while my wrist never touched its lips.
Photo by Jody Moore - all rights reserved
rodandbarrel:

I fished this past Sunday afternoon in the legendary Holylands of the deep everglades. The bass fishing here is exceptional and my last visit six weeks ago resulted in 150-fish landed in about 5-hours of fishing. (For the record - I don’t count missed strikes or fish that released themselves). Anyway, I caught this nice sow its belly presumably full of row. It slammed a watermelon colored Gambler Super Stud right off the surface in a cannon ball strike that startled me more than anything. Our bass here in South Florida spawn anytime now in late January and early February. Prior to spawn they feed pretty aggressively in the month of December. Some of the  biggest bass of the year are caught during the spawn. Ethical or not anglers do well targeting spawning beds with a 10-inch worm. As the worm is cast past and then reeled into the bed the bass assumes it is a snake attempting to eat its eggs and will attack it. My largest bass, an 11-pounder was caught this way early one March in the center of the State of Florida applying this very techniquw. I don’t have a photo to share of that fish because I was wading in waste deep water and had no camera with me. That day I caught 8-trophy fish the smallest at six-pounds, 2-seven pounders, 2-nines, a ten and the eleven. What bucket mouth the 11-pounder was. I had hooked it right at the back of it’s throat and it took all of my hand to reach in it mouth to work the hook out and all the while my wrist never touched its lips.
Photo by Jody Moore - all rights reserved

rodandbarrel:

I fished this past Sunday afternoon in the legendary Holylands of the deep everglades. The bass fishing here is exceptional and my last visit six weeks ago resulted in 150-fish landed in about 5-hours of fishing. (For the record - I don’t count missed strikes or fish that released themselves). Anyway, I caught this nice sow its belly presumably full of row. It slammed a watermelon colored Gambler Super Stud right off the surface in a cannon ball strike that startled me more than anything. Our bass here in South Florida spawn anytime now in late January and early February. Prior to spawn they feed pretty aggressively in the month of December. Some of the  biggest bass of the year are caught during the spawn. Ethical or not anglers do well targeting spawning beds with a 10-inch worm. As the worm is cast past and then reeled into the bed the bass assumes it is a snake attempting to eat its eggs and will attack it. My largest bass, an 11-pounder was caught this way early one March in the center of the State of Florida applying this very techniquw. I don’t have a photo to share of that fish because I was wading in waste deep water and had no camera with me. That day I caught 8-trophy fish the smallest at six-pounds, 2-seven pounders, 2-nines, a ten and the eleven. What bucket mouth the 11-pounder was. I had hooked it right at the back of it’s throat and it took all of my hand to reach in it mouth to work the hook out and all the while my wrist never touched its lips.

Photo by Jody Moore - all rights reserved

Comments